From June 2007 until November 2008, I worked in Kirkland, Washington on the sequel to F.E.A.R. at Monolith Productions.   This time I was back to what I do best, which is first-person shooter level design.   My primary focus was on a very complex mission which required a number of technical solutions, as well as support tasks on other levels.

F.E.A.R. 2: Project Origin

F.E.A.R. 2: Project Origin - Published by Warner Brothers Interactive Entertainment, Developed by Monolith Productions
Alma is back...

The level in particular that I was assigned - simply called "Approach" - features an extensive combat sequence on large trams that rotate around a single rail through an underground tunnel system. This is followed by an elaborate crash sequence that sends players exploring through the guts of the Armacham infrastructure, and an intense fire fight with snipers and elite soldiers in the depths of the subterranean facility. From there, players would ascend to the final level of the game.

F.E.A.R. 2: Project Origin

F.E.A.R. 2: Project Origin - Published by Warner Brothers Interactive Entertainment, Developed by Monolith Productions
F.E.A.R. 2: Project Origin's "Approach" Level - The Maintenance Bay

In addition to this level, I also worked on one of the game's turret battles that takes place in a devastated subway station.   The confrontation features an exploding fuel truck, a high-voltage electrical transformer, and a taxi that falls into the collapse. As all this mayhem unfolds, the game's intricate story hits an unexpected twist that changes the stakes of the mission.

F.E.A.R. 2: Project Origin

F.E.A.R. 2: Project Origin - Published by Warner Brothers Interactive Entertainment, Developed by Monolith Productions
F.E.A.R. 2: Project Origin's "Keegan" Level - The Collapsed Subway

There were other portions of the Keegan level where I worked on combat encounters, layout, and general bug fixes and polish. I learned a ton about what makes great AI, and valuable insights on level design from one of the best studios in the world. The levels I made would not have been as good without the team helping me to make them better.

Unfortunately I (and a number of other employees) were laid off shortly after the game went into RC0. During that transition there was apperantly some confusion and the game shipped with my name credited under Art instead of Design. Not a huge deal, but a minor hindrance when applying to other studios and confirming what I actually worked on. That's why this website exists!